Human Dynamics

In Construction Risk Management The Key to Success or Failure

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Review by Claire Bursnoll CEng MICE, Senior Lecturer in Construction Management, Kingston University, London

March 31, 2016

I came across this title when I was preparing material for an MSC...

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Matthew Bell, Senior Lecturer, Melbourne University School of Construction Law

October 17, 2015

“This book gives construction industry professionals, including lawyers, interesting and valuable insights into...

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Book review by Professor Rudi Klein, President of the NEC Users’ Group

September 7, 2015

“Human Dynamics in Construction Risk Management should be essential reading for all NEC...

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ResoLex RADAR Appointment

April 30, 2015

Charles O’Neil has been appointed as a Panel Member to ResoLex RADAR, in...

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Stanford University

April 22, 2015

Charles O’Neil and John McArthur (author of Chapter 19) were honoured to be...

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Book Endorsement: Tony Llewellyn, Project Team Coaching

January 28, 2015

“Charles and his co-authors have picked up on the behavioural issues that create...

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The ACICA Review December 2014 Issues Book Review

January 16, 2015

In the December 2014 issue of The ACICA Review, Charles O’Neil’s book “Human...

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An Extract from Dr Peter Hansford’s Foreword

January 16, 2015

The foreword of the book “Human Dynamics in Construction Risk Management” is written...

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Review by Claire Bursnoll CEng MICE, Senior Lecturer in Construction Management, Kingston University, London

March 31, 2016

I came across this title when I was preparing material for an MSC module on construction project risk management.

From experience I always felt project success was very much down to attitude, and by that I include values and behaviours of the team, the team including all major players; Client, Consultant, Contractor and Suppliers.  Where success is evident, I often see evidence of Steven Covey’s ‘7 Habits of Highly Effective People’ some of which are also demonstrated in the examples used in this book.

Presented in an easy to read way, using real projects to keep the attention of the reader, I would recommend this book to any manager or graduate seeking chartership in the construction field.  It is a lot of common sense, but for success the right attitude must be demonstrated all the time.

The final statement in the book sums it up well; you can have the best processes available, but success will depend on having the right people in the right positions doing the right things at the right time. (Coincidently, this sounds very familiar to the key elements required in CDM15, hopefully if enough people say it and practice it we’ll change any negative culture!)

We all know that doing the right thing at the right time requires strength of character, which in turn is helped by good communication and good motivational management.

A good reminder to be proactive and have the strength of character to do the right thing at the right time.

Thank you Charles

Kingston University Review by Claire Bursnoll CEng MICE, Senior Lecturer in Construction Management, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing, Kingston University, London